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Features Interviews

Full Force: In Conversation with Holy Sons’ Emil Amos – Part 1

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Features Interviews

MJ Guider interview: “I didn’t set out with a specific inspiration for making the record other than my standard compulsion”

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Interviews

Mitternacht interview: “we’re only ever going to do anything about climate change if we spend more time outdoors”

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Interviews

Peter Hook Interview: “I’ve managed to take Joy Division all round the world”

Banjo chats to to Joy Division and New Order’s bass viking about self belief, starting again and the absence of a happy ending.

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Interviews

Orbital Interview: “We’re trailblazers for the next generation”

Orbital’s Phil Hartnoll talks to Banjo.  And talks. And then talks some more.

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Interviews

Dave Haslam Interview: “There is a redemptive power in music”

Following the release of Dave Haslam’s autobiography Sonic Youth Slept On My Floor Banjo chatted with him about moving from post punk to dance, losing the safety net and playing The Smiths at Cream.

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Interviews

Tom Robinson Interview: “I’ve got no illusions about the political left any more than I’ve got about the political right, but I do have a shrewd idea which of the two is going to stomp on us first”

With the Tom Robinson Band’s classic debut album Power in the Darkness turning 40, Banjo caught up with the man himself to find out how he feels about it all now he’s older and wiser.

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Features Interviews

Land Trance interview: “Everything we do we feel sits in the broad continuum of psychedelic music”

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13 Questions Interviews

13 Questions with Gary Numan

Futurist pop legend Gary Numan answers 13 questions and tells us about getting arrested in India, his worst gig and why he doesn’t need to cook.

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13 Questions Interviews

13 Questions with Mogwai

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Interviews

Babybird’s Stephen Jones interview: “I am trying to look for the meaning of life but you’re never going to find it”

With a new album out and a Liverpool date on the horizon, Ant23 talks to Babybird about his incredible work rate, self-loathing and being spat at by Johnny Rotten.

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Books Interviews

Gerard Canney talks austerity, mental health, self-publishing and writing in secrecy

Indie author, Gerard Canney, has released his debut novel, Ambition and talks about the writing process, austerity, self-publishing and much more.

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Interviews

Steve Lamacq Interview: “There are a lot of people who deserve a break but they aren’t in the right place at the right time and I think it’s our job to put them in front of people. “

Steve Lamacq comes to Liverpool with 6 Music and Banjo talked to the much loved DJ about festivals, gig etiquette and snogging couples.

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Interviews

Glenn Gregory Interview: “I don’t have much of an ego and, truth to be told, I don’t much like being in the limelight. “

As one of pop’s busiest men Glenn Gregory takes time out to talk to Getintothis’ Banjo about what he is up to and why he keeps himself so busy.

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Interviews

Doreen Allen Interview: “I gave Johnny Thunders his rider when he came to do the soundcheck, and it was a bottle of brandy and a bottle of Baileys. He asked for a pint glass and poured it all in”

Allen, promoter, music fan extraordinaire and Liverpool legend, recently celebrated her 70th birthday, and we look back at a life less ordinary.

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Interviews

John Lydon Interview: “I was quite a shy kid, but what better way to get rid of your shyness than standing onstage in front of 500 people who hate you?”

Banjo speaks to John Lydon about Manchester, advertising butter and his plans for the future.

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Interviews Live

Ponderosa Glee Boys Interview

Ponderosa Glee Boys sprang out of the late 70’s Eric’s crowd and have since achieved a cult status as one of Liverpool’s great lost bands.

Encouraged to start a band by none other than Jayne Casey, Ponderosa Glee Boys emerged as purveyors of fine post punk. Rooted more in the Public Image Ltd school rather than the New York/Velvet Underground influences of much of the Liverpool scene bands at the time, the Glee Boys stood out.

For a while, all was going well.  Managed by the inestimable Doreen Allen, gigs at Eric’s, Brady’s and the Royal Court gave people a chance to catch them live and they signed to Inevitable Records, home of fellow scenesters Wah! Heat.

But there the good luck stopped and the band petered out. Unfortunately, Inevitable went bust before any records could be released, their singer left and the Glee Boys soon split up.

However, some high profile gigs and a lack of recorded material proved to be a potent mix for creating a mystique that kept the band in the minds of those involved in Liverpool’s music scene at the time.

And now, after all these years, the Ponderosa Glee Boys are back. With three Liverpool gigs over Christmas, the Glee Boys were finally able to show the world what it had been missing.

Ahead of this flurry of activity, Getintothis spoke to founder and vocalist Carl Eaton.

The Liverpool music scene of the late 70s was an incredibly fertile time and a great time to be starting a band.  “It started for me at a very young age” says Carl,  “The same as many others at the time by going to Eric’s and watching bands. It was something special, it was fresh and exciting to see Generation X, The Clash, The Stranglers – you know the ones. This gave a massive opportunity for local bands to fill in on some great support spots.

Big in Japan and The Spitfire Boys. were the first wave of Liverpool bands to hit and seeing all this going on really inspired me. Jayne Casey was the one who encouraged me to start a band and I learnt a lot from being around bands and a roadie Pink for Military Stand Alone.”

Getintothis: But with so many bands forming across the UK at the time, did it make a difference coming from Liverpool?

Carl Eaton:We were a young punk band in a great place at the right moment. The Liverpool scene was very incestuous, everyone knew each other. It felt as if were all part of the same group. We signed for inevitable records with Wah! Heat and Dead or Alive though they ran out of money and folded before we could release anything.

Doreen Allen was our manager and looking back she had the patience of a saint as we were very difficult to manage. We wouldn’t turn up to record at times or turn up drunk, etc. We were a great live band and hated studios and the whole idea of sitting in a room listening over and over to the same song for hours on end.

We got sent to record our single on a couple of occasions except we just got stoned with the engineer so they sent us out of Liverpool to record in a place in Rossendale. Unfortunately, that engineer also lead us astray.”

So what happened to the band?

We played some great gigs with some top bands like Killing Joke and John Peel loved us. We did a Peel Session that John replayed for us because he knew were skint and needed some spending money. I thought that was kind of him. I’m told we were one of his favourites.

The band got asked to play at the Futurama Festival at Stafford Bingley Hall with some other fantastic bands on the bill. We were told by the manager that Tommo, our singer, was leaving the band after the gig.

We came back to Liverpool and couldn’t find a suitable replacement so the band sat around for ages until we played Liverpool at the Warehouse with a brand new line up and me on vocals. It went down well but felt like flogging a dead horse so that was our final gig.”

How did the reunion come about?

I now live in Australia and had a Facebook message asking if we would get back together and play a gig for the Liverpool homeless. At first, I thought it was a joke but after speaking to Alan Jones he convinced me it could be a fantastic night meeting up with some great old friends and it was for a great cause.

The other reason was that the venue belongs to Jayne Casey so it seemed fitting to end it there.

I got in touch with our original guitarist Dave Banks who agreed straight away. [Original singer] Tommo has just vanished and no one could find him which meant once again I got to do the vocal and hand over bass playing.

We were lucky to get our good friend Mark Robson in on drums for the gig which is great because Mark is from the same Eric’s background, also playing in Liverpool bands and a close friend to the band.  I was going to start a band with Michael Mooney after the Glee Boys, but it didn’t take off. We were delighted when Michael agreed to join this time. He is an exceptional guitarist with experience playing with the Bunnymen, Psychedelic Furs and Spiritualized to name a few. 

The band get on really well and all musically on the same page.”

Any future plans for the Ponderosa Glee Boys?

Well we decided to write a complete new set of songs in keeping with our roots from the Eric’s era. We have a single out called Wake Up and an album coming out within the next month. We had only planned to form to play one last farewell gig however we were asked to do the Jeremy Corbyn gig which we used as a warm up for District and we went down really well. The new songs are great so hopefully we nail it and they are well received. We have been offered more gigs but who knows what’s next for us.”

The gigs themselves turned out to be a celebration rather than merely a sad farewell. 

At District, there is no denying that the night belongs to the Ponderosa Glee Boys. As the equipment is set up there is a palpable buzz in the air and District fills up with eager, anticipative souls. From the off the band do not disappoint.

Bravely electing to write a completely new set rather than spend their limited time re-learning their old one, they come across as effortlessly current. Guitarist and local legend Michael Mooney is simply astonishing. We should no doubt expect nothing less from a man with his track record, but his guitar work gives the songs an epic edge.  When Mooney and fellow guitarist Dave Banks lock together, the Glee Boys really take off and their resulting sound is huge and impressive.

All the songs heard tonight such mass appeal it is shocking to think that this may be the only chance we have to hear them live.

Carl Eaton’s grumpy front man manner belies his obvious delight at being back on stage with the Glee Boys in front of such an appreciative crowd. Ponderosa Glee Boys have moved way beyond both their punk and post punk roots and have arrived at a sound that acknowledges where it comes from but aims squarely for the present.

Ponderosa Glee Boys are, after only a few short weeks together, in a place where many bands never manage to find themselves. They are tight, musically defined and have a set of songs that demand to be played repeatedly. As singer Carl now lives in Australia, the logistics of recording and rehearsing are obviously tricky, but surely walking away from this having got everything to this stage would be tricky also.

At least this time, they will leave behind them some physical trace of their existence, with their excellent Awake! album available now from Punk Town Records.

Banjo

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Interviews

Trevor Fung Interview: “if you love music you just follow your heart”

Dance Music legend Trevor Fung talks about the changing face of Ibiza and the birth of Acid House

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Interviews

Paul Cook Interview: “There was no Pistols manifesto or anything, but we did go out to shake things up”

Banjo speaks to ex-Pistol Paul Cook about his past and his present.

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Interviews

Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs talk Brexit and the seven deadly sins

With Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs’ much anticipated second album King Of Cowards boxed-off,  we chewed the fat with the Newcastle five-piece.